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It's easy to make jokes about Emeril [Lagasse], and God knows I did, for many years, but I think on balance, looking back, you have to say that he was a positive factor in the power shift towards chefs. You certainly didn't want to imagine or picture him. We have to have a salmon." By the time we've finished with all the have-to-haves, the things that you were good at, and believed in, and were passionate about, there wasn't much room left for that. Now, nobody goes to Le Bernardin with, you know, "I feel like a nice piece of flounder." No, you go in because you've heard that Eric Ripert and his team does something really special there, and you want that. So I can endure a Guy Fieri if he's part of that process. Do you feel like these shows have created a false impression of what it's like to work in a kitchen? But anybody who goes in laboring under the assumption or thinking it's going to be easy or glamorous is going to be very, very quickly dissuaded. I mean, they're not telling them that, if you're 35, you're going to be grandpa in the kitchen. But fine dining attracts a different type of consumer. It's more and more difficult to even run a fine-dining restaurant.

He helped make people give a fuck about who's cooking. "The chef feels very proud of this particular--" "I don't give a fuck what the chef thinks -- I want a mixed grill! He was a nameless schlub in the back who was there to serve you. People are actually interested in hearing those things. You're going to be, chances are, the oldest person in the kitchen. Won't the average American reject this trend if it takes hold, because they'll see prices going up? The profit margins are not getting bigger; they will probably get smaller.

So that's something that I think it would be useful to point out. I mean, there aren't a lot of 50-year-old chefs still working the line. I think the food that we value, status-wise, is [changing].

That if you have a good job, you're 35 years old, and you think it's going to be easy, or that you're going to make a good living, you at least need a realistic picture of what the business is really like before you make a jump or a commitment like that. Because I've seen that so many times, kids coming out of cooking school and working in my kitchens, and literally two weeks in, you see it. You can get just as much bragging rights these days saying, "I found this amazing Sichuan noodle place in the ass-end of Queens. The noodles are

It's easy to make jokes about Emeril [Lagasse], and God knows I did, for many years, but I think on balance, looking back, you have to say that he was a positive factor in the power shift towards chefs. You certainly didn't want to imagine or picture him. We have to have a salmon." By the time we've finished with all the have-to-haves, the things that you were good at, and believed in, and were passionate about, there wasn't much room left for that. Now, nobody goes to Le Bernardin with, you know, "I feel like a nice piece of flounder." No, you go in because you've heard that Eric Ripert and his team does something really special there, and you want that. So I can endure a Guy Fieri if he's part of that process. Do you feel like these shows have created a false impression of what it's like to work in a kitchen? But anybody who goes in laboring under the assumption or thinking it's going to be easy or glamorous is going to be very, very quickly dissuaded. I mean, they're not telling them that, if you're 35, you're going to be grandpa in the kitchen. But fine dining attracts a different type of consumer. It's more and more difficult to even run a fine-dining restaurant.He helped make people give a fuck about who's cooking. "The chef feels very proud of this particular--" "I don't give a fuck what the chef thinks -- I want a mixed grill! He was a nameless schlub in the back who was there to serve you. People are actually interested in hearing those things. You're going to be, chances are, the oldest person in the kitchen. Won't the average American reject this trend if it takes hold, because they'll see prices going up? The profit margins are not getting bigger; they will probably get smaller.So that's something that I think it would be useful to point out. I mean, there aren't a lot of 50-year-old chefs still working the line. I think the food that we value, status-wise, is [changing].That if you have a good job, you're 35 years old, and you think it's going to be easy, or that you're going to make a good living, you at least need a realistic picture of what the business is really like before you make a jump or a commitment like that. Because I've seen that so many times, kids coming out of cooking school and working in my kitchens, and literally two weeks in, you see it. You can get just as much bragging rights these days saying, "I found this amazing Sichuan noodle place in the ass-end of Queens. The noodles are $1.29, they're the best fucking noodles you've ever had. Also, look at who's eating at Le Bernardin, for instance.Which meant they started to actually care about what they thought they should eat. When, in fact, he was the first person you should listen to. For most of my career, setting a menu, 90% of it was, "Well, you have to have this." The conventional wisdom is, for any chance of success, "We have to have, like, a Caesar salad. That it is physically hard, and that you're going to be getting paid shit, if you're lucky, for the first few years. I'm just saying not everybody thinks it's a great idea. There is a problem; I don't know if this is the answer. I mean, currently, the restaurant business is, generally speaking, not a good living, particularly for cooks. That space, that part of the market, will probably continue to shrink.When you go in a restaurant, who knows better about what's good? And if you want to be really good, then you will insist upon getting paid shit, because what you should be doing is working for somebody really, really good for as close to nothing as they're willing to give you, in return for the experience. I think the fact that Danny Meyer chose to do it is an indicator of what the future is going to be. I do have friends, however, who provide full benefits, very good salaries, and very good health care who really have a problem with it and say that it is not viable for their system. And it's not a healthy workplace for your mental health. People want to move towards casual; more fun, more casual, less demanding, more accessible is only increasing.

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It's easy to make jokes about Emeril [Lagasse], and God knows I did, for many years, but I think on balance, looking back, you have to say that he was a positive factor in the power shift towards chefs. You certainly didn't want to imagine or picture him. We have to have a salmon." By the time we've finished with all the have-to-haves, the things that you were good at, and believed in, and were passionate about, there wasn't much room left for that. Now, nobody goes to Le Bernardin with, you know, "I feel like a nice piece of flounder." No, you go in because you've heard that Eric Ripert and his team does something really special there, and you want that. So I can endure a Guy Fieri if he's part of that process. Do you feel like these shows have created a false impression of what it's like to work in a kitchen? But anybody who goes in laboring under the assumption or thinking it's going to be easy or glamorous is going to be very, very quickly dissuaded. I mean, they're not telling them that, if you're 35, you're going to be grandpa in the kitchen. But fine dining attracts a different type of consumer. It's more and more difficult to even run a fine-dining restaurant.

He helped make people give a fuck about who's cooking. "The chef feels very proud of this particular--" "I don't give a fuck what the chef thinks -- I want a mixed grill! He was a nameless schlub in the back who was there to serve you. People are actually interested in hearing those things. You're going to be, chances are, the oldest person in the kitchen. Won't the average American reject this trend if it takes hold, because they'll see prices going up? The profit margins are not getting bigger; they will probably get smaller.

So that's something that I think it would be useful to point out. I mean, there aren't a lot of 50-year-old chefs still working the line. I think the food that we value, status-wise, is [changing].

That if you have a good job, you're 35 years old, and you think it's going to be easy, or that you're going to make a good living, you at least need a realistic picture of what the business is really like before you make a jump or a commitment like that. Because I've seen that so many times, kids coming out of cooking school and working in my kitchens, and literally two weeks in, you see it. You can get just as much bragging rights these days saying, "I found this amazing Sichuan noodle place in the ass-end of Queens. The noodles are $1.29, they're the best fucking noodles you've ever had. Also, look at who's eating at Le Bernardin, for instance.

Which meant they started to actually care about what they thought they should eat. When, in fact, he was the first person you should listen to. For most of my career, setting a menu, 90% of it was, "Well, you have to have this." The conventional wisdom is, for any chance of success, "We have to have, like, a Caesar salad. That it is physically hard, and that you're going to be getting paid shit, if you're lucky, for the first few years. I'm just saying not everybody thinks it's a great idea. There is a problem; I don't know if this is the answer. I mean, currently, the restaurant business is, generally speaking, not a good living, particularly for cooks. That space, that part of the market, will probably continue to shrink.

When you go in a restaurant, who knows better about what's good? And if you want to be really good, then you will insist upon getting paid shit, because what you should be doing is working for somebody really, really good for as close to nothing as they're willing to give you, in return for the experience. I think the fact that Danny Meyer chose to do it is an indicator of what the future is going to be. I do have friends, however, who provide full benefits, very good salaries, and very good health care who really have a problem with it and say that it is not viable for their system. And it's not a healthy workplace for your mental health. People want to move towards casual; more fun, more casual, less demanding, more accessible is only increasing.

It attacks with antibodies the bogus, the dangerous, the toxic, and drives it out. I'm willing to try anything that is making an earnest attempt to be delicious. I don't think that I've suffered from that and, over time, it's something I never took seriously. It's the same way -- I've sat at tables where somebody's bringing out one fantastic, life-changing wine after another. They think that I'm a known quantity, that I'm a cheap date, that I like street noodles pretty much more than anything. , you write, "Home fries almost always suck," and that you're not really into breakfast potatoes in general.

.29, they're the best fucking noodles you've ever had. Also, look at who's eating at Le Bernardin, for instance.

Which meant they started to actually care about what they thought they should eat. When, in fact, he was the first person you should listen to. For most of my career, setting a menu, 90% of it was, "Well, you have to have this." The conventional wisdom is, for any chance of success, "We have to have, like, a Caesar salad. That it is physically hard, and that you're going to be getting paid shit, if you're lucky, for the first few years. I'm just saying not everybody thinks it's a great idea. There is a problem; I don't know if this is the answer. I mean, currently, the restaurant business is, generally speaking, not a good living, particularly for cooks. That space, that part of the market, will probably continue to shrink.

When you go in a restaurant, who knows better about what's good? And if you want to be really good, then you will insist upon getting paid shit, because what you should be doing is working for somebody really, really good for as close to nothing as they're willing to give you, in return for the experience. I think the fact that Danny Meyer chose to do it is an indicator of what the future is going to be. I do have friends, however, who provide full benefits, very good salaries, and very good health care who really have a problem with it and say that it is not viable for their system. And it's not a healthy workplace for your mental health. People want to move towards casual; more fun, more casual, less demanding, more accessible is only increasing.

It attacks with antibodies the bogus, the dangerous, the toxic, and drives it out. I'm willing to try anything that is making an earnest attempt to be delicious. I don't think that I've suffered from that and, over time, it's something I never took seriously. It's the same way -- I've sat at tables where somebody's bringing out one fantastic, life-changing wine after another. They think that I'm a known quantity, that I'm a cheap date, that I like street noodles pretty much more than anything. , you write, "Home fries almost always suck," and that you're not really into breakfast potatoes in general.

Now you have a lot of people who want to be in the service industry. If you look at the growth in the sommelier trade, the quality of servers in decent restaurants, I think, has gone up considerably, on balance. There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to "follow their passion." This was always a lethal instinct. And I think the genuine problem is that there are a lot of cooking schools around the country who, in a predatory way, have contributed to or have essentially knowingly encouraged people who, in good conscience, should not be encouraged, and leading them to believe that, at 35 years old, they will be able to roll out of this third-tier cooking school, saddled with a huge and often punitive debt, and somehow ever get out from under. The people who go to a place like Gramercy Tavern know they're going to pay a lot of money to eat.And I think, as we become more Asian in character, which I expect that we will continue to become, that those values will become more and more our values. You don't leave thinking, Any despairing moments recently? I mean, the worst ever fast-food meal I've ever had -- I am often guilty of hyperbole, but sometimes, in a vulnerable moment, I will find myself at an airport, hungry, and there'll be no other option but an airport burger. And I reach into, like, a shelf and just pull out this pre-cooked burger. Now, it's true, they're paid minimum wage, probably, or close to it. And we are seeing, apparently, a lot of these outfits, their market share is shrinking. I think fear and contempt of generic fast food is a useful instinct. We are merciless in our hypocrisy and our denial, particularly as far as synthroid opiates right now. Or, maybe it's going to cost a little, and I'll help." That place doesn't really exist right now. A cultural shift within the industry probably needs to happen, too, right? I don't see a lot of drugs in restaurants the way I used to. I would say that the angriest critiques I get from people about shows are when I'm drinking whatever convenient cold beer is available in a particular place, and not drinking the best beer out there. And I die a little bit when she says, "Can I just eat in front of the TV? I don't have time to do more, but I would happily do more.Meaning, people will drive 45 minutes for the right bowl of noodles. And if it's a bad, carelessly presented burger, where they clearly do not give a fuck, they just can't be bothered, where it's just this ugly machine, and they sling it out, I literally go into a spiral of depression. I had a burger at a Johnny Rockets in an airport, and it didn't just ruin my day -- it ruined my week. They didn't even bother to re-dunk the fries in the grease. An argument is made, when I complain about these things, "Well, you know, if you were getting paid minimum wage, standing in an airport, slinging burgers, you wouldn't give a fuck, either." You know what? There's plenty of room -- it's like the independent bookstore versus the massive chain. I haven't seen a lot of cocaine in the industry in quite some time. I would like to be able to help them when they need help, just as I would like to help anyone -- particularly as it relates to drugs. Look, we allowed this massive spread of prescription drugs. I would like to see a situation where I could go to a cook, or an employer could go to a cook, and say, "Look, you're fucked up. There's a place down the street, they help people like you. Snorting a rail off your cutting board at the end of the shift in front of your coworkers would not be OK at any good restaurant in New York that I know of. Even eating in bed -- the commingling food and other bodily functions is not something I'm into. I read somewhere that, based on some drinking on the show, you were getting flamed online from beer snobs. You know, I haven't made the effort to walk down the street 10 blocks to the microbrewery where they're making some fucking Mumford and Sons IPA. " I'm like, "Aw, fuck." So I've become -- as maybe all of us do -- my parents in some way. The true god of the restaurant business, of professional cooking, is not brilliance and creativity. It is doing the same thing, exactly the same, again and again and again. Bourdain: I am very, very much for all restaurant people making a living wage. And you know, two weeks' vacation was pretty much unthinkable -- there wouldn't be a job waiting for me when I came back. What do you think is the worst, dumbest, most pointless food trend right now?Because as it is now, most restaurant people cannot afford to eat in their own restaurants. I never had health insurance for almost all of my career. Bourdain: Look, generally speaking, I'm surprisingly accepting of these little trends and trendlets as part of a larger, positive process.It's something of a regular feature on You ever run into the restaurant owner you were interviewing with again? I've heard from people who were at the interview or certainly worked at what was in fact Bobby Van's, and apparently, I got his brogue wrong, too. There are so many cooking and food-travel shows now, which is great in general.But have you found there to be any negative aspects to the rise of reality cooking shows?On July 14, 2016, I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to sit down with Anthony Bourdain for an interview.I will always remember our wide-ranging, candid conversation.If you think you have celiac disease, shouldn't you see a fucking doctor before you annoy the fuck out of people at a party? Bourdain: I haven't, and I'm dubious of it, of course. If you tell me it cooks a hamburger better than a grill, I'm willing to believe it. I know of a chef who I like very much, but he was doing edible menus. It would not be my preferred mouthful, let's put it that way. Bourdain: No, I don't think anyone would be so foolish as to invite me. I think my tastes, at this point, are pretty well-known. There are people out there, and they are legion, but nobody's eating at their restaurants. Bourdain: Well, I would like it to look like Singapore. Alcoholism is probably the number one problem in the restaurant industry. If you bring me a really good one, a good craft beer, I will enjoy it, and say so. I was in San Francisco, and I was desperate for beer, and I walked into this place. And I sat down, and I looked up, and I noticed there was a wide selection of beers I'd never heard of. Mingles perfectly with a runny yolk and soaks it up. So it was very exciting and not something you did a lot. But I did grow up in a time where the TV dinner was seen as freedom. That Swanson meatloaf with the fucking brownie -- that meant you didn't have to sit at the table. That was liberating -- at least we thought of it at the time as this liberating modern, you know, wonder food.This sort of herd mentality around juice-cleansing. And, you know, papier-mâché is edible too, technically. I spent some time with Nathan Myhrvold, who worked with me on my book. And this is a guy who is pushing that sort of experimental, scientific exploration of what can be done with food about as far as you can go. It was -- much like Ferran Adrià -- it was food first, not "look at me, I'm a genius." For all of the unpleasant imitations of what they did at el Bulli, I think it is worth reminding people that, at all times, el Bulli was delicious first. The techniques were seemingly tortuous, but generally speaking, there were three or four ingredients. With hawker centers, with independently owned and operated businesses, who have been, for some time, doing the same one or two dishes very, very, very, very well. Because it's "organic." At least people are thinking about what they're putting in their mouths. Are we going to crack down on drugs and not alcohol? As a teenager, I mean, you know, I was indifferent to it. I don't have to sit here and answer questions about what we did?

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  1. S5 E2 Not In Our Backyard While the Southern boats are off to a good start, Captain Greg Mayer of the Fishin’ Frenzy is desperate to land his first fish of the season.

  2. Fuck you, Comcast. 480p is FUCKING BELOW EVEN FUCKING NORMAL HD and the general populous of Comcast users are used to watching in

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